The Connection Between Gluten And A Leaky Gut

Do you suffer from a bloating stomach, mild to severe discomfort, even weight gain?

This article should shed some light on the hidden ingredients in foods causing your muffin top and assists you in your fight with weight gain.

Relax… We can help you by being your partner in health!

~Your Life Sources Team~

 

Gluten troubles were once thought to be primarily a condition affecting people with Celiac Disease.  Recent research indicates that gluten-related disorders extend to a far broader population and affect much more than the digestive system.

First things first: What is gluten?

Gluten is a two-part “sticky” protein found in grains, most notably wheat, as well as rye, barley, and others. It’s considered sticky because it holds together the nutrient stores of the plant it’s in. This stickiness is why it’s so commonly used in processed foods as a binder and filler. It’s a two-part protein because it’s made up of the peptides gliadin and glutenin.

Why is gluten such a problem now?

We’re no longer eating the wheat that our parents ate. In order to have the drought-resistant, bug-resistant, and faster-growing wheat that we have today, we’ve hybridized the grain. It’s estimated that 5% of the proteins found in hybridized wheat are new proteins that were not found in either of the original wheat plants. These “new proteins” are part of the problem that has lead to increased system inflammation and intolerance of gluten.

Today’s wheat has also been deamidated, which allows it to be water soluble and capable of being mixed into virtually every kind of packaged food. This deamidation has been shown to produce a large immune response in many people. Lastly, in our modern fast-paced world with fast food at our fingertips, we’re eating much more wheat than our ancestors ever did.

So, what happens when we eat gluten?

Whenever the whole-wheat pasta or a 12-grain sandwich you innocently eat for lunch reaches your intestines, something called tissue transglutaminase (tTG), which is an enzyme produced in your intestinal wall, breaks down the gluten into its building blocks, gliadin and glutenin.

As things make their way through your digestive system, your gut-associated lymphoid tissue, or GALT, which is the term for the immune system in your gut, reviews everything to check for potentially harmful substances. In people who have no issues with gluten, this process goes smoothly and the food is absorbed. In those with gluten sensitivity, the GALT identifies gliadin as a dangerous substance and produces antibodies to attack it. In celiacs these antibodies don’t just attack the gliadin, they attack the tTG as well, which is what originally broke down the gluten into its two parts.

This enzyme, tTG, has a number of jobs, but one of its most important contributions to the body is holding together the microvilli in our gut. Your body collects nutrients by absorbing them through the walls of your intestines, and the more surface area there is, the more they can absorb. Imagine trying to soak up a gallon of water with a paper towel versus a bath towel. Microvilli, which look like hairy fingers, exist in your intestines to increase the surface area and absorb nutrients.

When the antibodies your body produced to defend itself against gliadin attack your tTG, these microvilli can atrophy and erode, decreasing your ability to absorb nutrients and allowing the walls of your intestines to become leaky. This can manifest itself in digestive symptoms, including bloating, constipation, diarrhea, weight loss, fat malabsorption, and malnutrition like iron deficiency or anemia, low vitamin D or even osteoporosis. This blunting of the microvilli is the hallmark of celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disease.

How does gluten cause intestinal permeability, AKA leaky gut?

As mentioned above, in order to absorb nutrients, our gut is somewhat permeable to very small molecules. Regulating intestinal permeability is one of the basic functions of the cells that line the intestinal wall. In sensitive people, gluten can cause the gut cells to release zonulin, a protein that can break the tight junctions apart.

Once these tight junctions get broken apart, you’re considered to have a leaky gut. When your gut is leaky, toxins, microbes and undigested food particles — among other things — escape from your intestines and travel throughout your body via your bloodstream. One of the things allowed to escape are the antibodies your body produced to attack the gliadin in the first place.

What is the link between gluten, systemic inflammation and autoimmune diseases?

Unfortunately, these antibodies often confuse more than just tTG for gliadin, and end up attacking other organs and systems, from the skin to the thyroid to the brain. This is why gluten sensitivity is so frequently paired with autoimmune conditions, and why those with celiac disease are at risk of developing a second autoimmune disease.

Gluten is causing your body to attack itself, sometimes on multiple fronts. The fact that something you eat is causing an issue for you outside of your digestive system, such as rheumatoid arthritis or autoimmune thyroid, is why many people go so long without realizing they have a problem with gluten. If you have an autoimmune disease you should get tested for gluten sensitivity, and if you’re gluten intolerant you should get screened for autoimmunity.

What should you do if you suspect you’re gluten intolerant?

The single best way to determine if you have an issue with gluten is to take it out of your diet for at least three weeks, then reintroduce it. Please note that gluten is a very large protein and can take months to clear from your system, so the longer you can eliminate it from your diet before reintroducing it, the better.

The best advice that I share with my patients is that if they feel significantly better without gluten or feel worse when they reintroduce it, then gluten is likely a problem for them. In order to get accurate results from this testing method, you must eliminate 100% of the gluten from your diet.

Another way to determine if you’re gluten intolerant is to ask your doctor to order the following tests:

IgA anti-gliadin antibodies (these are found in about 80% of people with celiac disease),

IgG anti-gliadin antibodies

IgA anti-endomysial antibodies

Tissue Transglutaminase antibodies

Total IgA antibodies

I’d like to mention that one potential problem with testing is that gluten is made up of several hundred peptides and gliadin is made up of 12 different sub-fractions. Most modern testing focuses on only the alpha-gliadin (one of the twelve sub-fractions) and therefore leaves considerable room for error and false negative tests.

At the end of the day, I tell my patients that your body knows better than any test. If you feel better when you take gluten out of your diet or feel worse when you add it back in, you still have an issue with gluten—even if you get a negative test result. Don’t eat it!

How to treat gluten sensitivity and celiac disease?

Eliminating gluten 100% from your diet means 100%. Even trace amounts of gluten from cross-contamination, medications or supplements can be enough to cause an immune reaction in your body. The 80/20 rule, or “we don’t eat it in our house, just when we eat out” is a complete misconception. A Lancet article published in 2001 states that for those with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, eating gluten just once a month increased the relative risk of death by 600%.

I tell my patients that even though the  manifestation of eating gluten may be mild bloating or headache,  their immune system is being stimulated and the effects may last for three to six months.

For many, simply removing 100% of gluten from their diet isn’t enough. The damage that has been caused to the gut lining must also be healed. Additionally, I often find that there are other infections in the gut such as parasites, Candida, bacterial overgrowth, and bacterial imbalances that need to be addressed and corrected. For some, there may be a need to go completely grain-free due to the cross reactivity of gliadin sub-fractions in non-gluten grains. Also, gut restoration may be in order to restore the gut mucosa and increase gut immunity. Due to the brevity of this subject, give our office a call and will be happy to discuss a protocol for healing of the gut with you!

(916) 536-9930

When in doubt, go without. You’re not missing any vital nutrients by not eating gluten. In fact, you may be saving your life or the life of someone you love.

© 2013 Life Sources, Inc

All Rights Reserved

 

How To Reduce Your Flat Tammy In Just Few Days

# Step One

If you want to build muscle and burn fat at the same time. How can you achieve this? Indulge in full body exercises like lunges, push-ups, and pull-ups, for one set of 15 repetitions. Don’t forget to follow every exercise with one minute of jumping rope. You should be able to burn around 500 to 600 calories per workout.

# Step TwoYou have to work on your abdominal muscles three times in the week. Crunches and leg raises for three sets of 20 repetitions should be done. Also, do planks by holding your body in a push-up position on your elbows for 30 to 60 seconds for four sets.

# Step three:

The kind of food you will eat in this period is vital in bringing about any change. Natural foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads and pastas, chicken, beef, fish and low fat dairy should replace processed foods full of sugar.

# Step four:

To minimize water retention, lower your sodium intake. This means you need to avoid salt. You can flavour your food with other herbs and spices instead.

# Step five:

Stressing and anxiety can cause the over-production of a certain hormone called cortisol, which encourages weight gain about the belly area. So try to keep your cool!

A Holistic Approach to Chronic Illnesses, Autism, & other Pervasive Development Disorders.

As Seen In WellBeing Resource! Pick up yours today At Life Sources Inc

5006 Sunrise Blvd, Suit 101, Fair Oaks, CA, 95628

916-536-9930

 

Andrea McCreery, PhD, CMAT, CNC
Life Sources®, Inc. Wellness Center
916-536-9930 • Fair Oaks

A Holistic Approach to Chronic Illnesses, Autism, & other Pervasive Development Disorders. At Life Sources® Inc., since 1999, Dr. Andrea McCreery has been utilizing a Holistic Approach to all Chronic Illnesses including her recent discovery for reversing symptoms for Autism and Asperger’s known as pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs). Her high-powered binocular microscope at 1500xs magnification has a proven track record of success in solving the body’s health mysteries. From the common cold to Mycoplasma infections which are at the root cause of all autoimmune disorders, she simplifies health by explaining, educating, and empowering many discouraged people who have lost their Wellness, Energy, & Vitality. Andrea will guide you step by step, helping to achieve your goals. The analysis of your blood, taken painlessly from the finger, is placed on a slide where results are projected onto a large video monitor, creating your “window to a hidden world”. The client can see exactly what is happening within their immune system contributing to their illness symptoms. These cells are then analyzed and the “dots are connected“. This approach to Targeted Nutritional Intervention takes around an hour; explaining those sometimes vague and inconsistent symptoms. From this evaluation, she puts together an easy to follow Individualized Nutritional Health Plan. Her clients feel very comfortable in her laid back & extremely friendly office. Mention WellBEing for a new client discount!  Please visit the Testimony “Our Nathan is Back” at:
www.life-sources.com/pages/Testimonials

3 thoughts on “A Holistic Approach to Chronic Illnesses, Autism, & other Pervasive Development Disorders.”

  1. Hello there! I simply want to give you a big thumbs up for your excellent information you’ve got here on this post. I will be returning to your blog for more soon.

    • Hello!
      And, to let you know, we appreciate your encouraging words regarding our phenomenal findings in the reversal and/or lessening of certain side-effects that our Autistic clients have found relief than was previously thought! Our Flagship product, Immuzyme(R) continues to be an interesting product; many people need to hear & understand more about this amazing product… it’s “not Hype”; has been formulated to address heavy metal detoxification, enhance the oxygenation of the red blood cells, increase energy, relieve pain in those with Arthritis (just to name one amazing benefit… and, balances the Krebs Cycle resulting in resetting the ATP Cycle for a much improved Lifestyle when many have lost all hope!
      We’d enjoy hearing from you more in the near future & again, thank you for appreciating our Article posted in Healthy Living Magazine!
      Your Life-Sources’ Team!

  2. We really appreciate your taking time to post this much appreciated comment! And, it’s extremely encouraging to know there are people out there who are benefiting from our Healthy updates; humor, scientific info, “clean-healthy eating”, and more through our recipes and anything you find useful from our comments to encourage a happier & healthier Lifestyle & Well-being!
    Let us know if there’s anything specific in that we can assist you!
    Your Life-Sources’ Team!~

Slow Cooker Chex Mix

Slow Cooker Chex Mix

Did you know that your favorite homemade Chex Mix recipe can be made in the slow cooker? Give it a try!

Ingredients:

  • 9 cups Chex cereal (I used equal parts corn, rice, and wheat Chex)
  • 2 cups pretzels
  • 1 cup Cheerios
  • 1 cup peanuts
  • 1/3 cup (6 Tablespoons) butter, melted and hot
  • 1 Tablespoon seasoned salt
  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional)

Directions:

Add cereal, pretzels, cheerios and peanuts to the bowl of a slow cooker.

In a separate bowl, whisk together butter and seasoned salt until the salt is dissolved.  Stir in the Worcestershire sauce until combined.

Drizzle the sauce evenly over the top of the cereal mixture.  Toss for about 1 minute, or until the mixture is evenly combined.

Cover and slow cook on low for 3 hours,  stirring at the 1 hour, 2 hour and 2.5 hour marks so that the mixture does not burn.  Then spread the mixture out onto a few baking sheets or parchment paper in an even layer until it cools to room temperature.  Serve, or store in a sealed container for up to 3 weeks.

*If your slow cooker does not have a tiny hole in it to let air escape, it may collect too much condensation which could make the Chex Mix get too soggy.  If that is the case, I recommend placing a towel underneath the lid of the slow cooker to collect the condensation.

So here’s how I made it. Enjoy!

The Connection Between Gluten And A Leaky Gut

Gluten troubles were once thought to be primarily a condition affecting people with Celiac Disease.  Recent research indicates that gluten-related disorders extend to a far broader population and affect much more than the digestive system.

First things first: What is gluten?

Gluten is a two-part “sticky” protein found in grains, most notably wheat, as well as rye, barley, and others. It’s considered sticky because it holds together the nutrient stores of the plant it’s in. This stickiness is why it’s so commonly used in processed foods as a binder and filler. It’s a two-part protein because it’s made up of the peptides gliadin and glutenin.

Why is gluten such a problem now?

We’re no longer eating the wheat that our parents ate. In order to have the drought-resistant, bug-resistant, and faster-growing wheat that we have today, we’ve hybridized the grain. It’s estimated that 5% of the proteins found in hybridized wheat are new proteins that were not found in either of the original wheat plants. These “new proteins” are part of the problem that has lead to increased system inflammation and intolerance of gluten.

Today’s wheat has also been deamidated, which allows it to be water soluble and capable of being mixed into virtually every kind of packaged food. This deamidation has been shown to produce a large immune response in many people. Lastly, in our modern fast-paced world with fast food at our fingertips, we’re eating much more wheat than our ancestors ever did.

So, what happens when we eat gluten?

Whenever the whole-wheat pasta or a 12-grain sandwich you innocently eat for lunch reaches your intestines, something called tissue transglutaminase (tTG), which is an enzyme produced in your intestinal wall, breaks down the gluten into its building blocks, gliadin and glutenin.

As things make their way through your digestive system, your gut-associated lymphoid tissue, or GALT, which is the term for the immune system in your gut, reviews everything to check for potentially harmful substances. In people who have no issues with gluten, this process goes smoothly and the food is absorbed. In those with gluten sensitivity, the GALT identifies gliadin as a dangerous substance and produces antibodies to attack it. In celiacs these antibodies don’t just attack the gliadin, they attack the tTG as well, which is what originally broke down the gluten into its two parts.

This enzyme, tTG, has a number of jobs, but one of its most important contributions to the body is holding together the microvilli in our gut. Your body collects nutrients by absorbing them through the walls of your intestines, and the more surface area there is, the more they can absorb. Imagine trying to soak up a gallon of water with a paper towel versus a bath towel. Microvilli, which look like hairy fingers, exist in your intestines to increase the surface area and absorb nutrients.

When the antibodies your body produced to defend itself against gliadin attack your tTG, these microvilli can atrophy and erode, decreasing your ability to absorb nutrients and allowing the walls of your intestines to become leaky. This can manifest itself in digestive symptoms, including bloating, constipation, diarrhea, weight loss, fat malabsorption, and malnutrition like iron deficiency or anemia, low vitamin D or even osteoporosis. This blunting of the microvilli is the hallmark of celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disease.

How does gluten cause intestinal permeability, AKA leaky gut?

As mentioned above, in order to absorb nutrients, our gut is somewhat permeable to very small molecules. Regulating intestinal permeability is one of the basic functions of the cells that line the intestinal wall. In sensitive people, gluten can cause the gut cells to release zonulin, a protein that can break the tight junctions apart.

Once these tight junctions get broken apart, you’re considered to have a leaky gut. When your gut is leaky, toxins, microbes and undigested food particles — among other things — escape from your intestines and travel throughout your body via your bloodstream. One of the things allowed to escape are the antibodies your body produced to attack the gliadin in the first place.

What is the link between gluten, systemic inflammation and autoimmune diseases?

Unfortunately, these antibodies often confuse more than just tTG for gliadin, and end up attacking other organs and systems, from the skin to the thyroid to the brain. This is why gluten sensitivity is so frequently paired with autoimmune conditions, and why those with celiac disease are at risk of developing a second autoimmune disease.

Gluten is causing your body to attack itself, sometimes on multiple fronts. The fact that something you eat is causing an issue for you outside of your digestive system, such as rheumatoid arthritis or autoimmune thyroid, is why many people go so long without realizing they have a problem with gluten. If you have an autoimmune disease you should get tested for gluten sensitivity, and if you’re gluten intolerant you should get screened for autoimmunity.

What should you do if you suspect you’re gluten intolerant?

The single best way to determine if you have an issue with gluten is to take it out of your diet for at least three weeks, then reintroduce it. Please note that gluten is a very large protein and can take months to clear from your system, so the longer you can eliminate it from your diet before reintroducing it, the better.

The best advice that I share with my patients is that if they feel significantly better without gluten or feel worse when they reintroduce it, then gluten is likely a problem for them. In order to get accurate results from this testing method, you must eliminate 100% of the gluten from your diet.

Another way to determine if you’re gluten intolerant is to ask your doctor to order the following tests:

IgA anti-gliadin antibodies (these are found in about 80% of people with celiac disease),

IgG anti-gliadin antibodies

IgA anti-endomysial antibodies

Tissue Transglutaminase antibodies

Total IgA antibodies

I’d like to mention that one potential problem with testing is that gluten is made up of several hundred peptides and gliadin is made up of 12 different sub-fractions. Most modern testing focuses on only the alpha-gliadin (one of the twelve sub-fractions) and therefore leaves considerable room for error and false negative tests.

At the end of the day, I tell my patients that your body knows better than any test. If you feel better when you take gluten out of your diet or feel worse when you add it back in, you still have an issue with gluten—even if you get a negative test result. Don’t eat it!

How to treat gluten sensitivity and celiac disease?

Eliminating gluten 100% from your diet means 100%. Even trace amounts of gluten from cross-contamination, medications or supplements can be enough to cause an immune reaction in your body. The 80/20 rule, or “we don’t eat it in our house, just when we eat out” is a complete misconception. A Lancet article published in 2001 states that for those with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, eating gluten just once a month increased the relative risk of death by 600%.

I tell my patients that even though the outward manifestation of eating gluten may be mild bloating or headache, inside their body, their immune system is being stimulated and the effects may last for three to six months.

For many, simply removing 100% of gluten from their diet isn’t enough. The damage that has been caused to the gut lining must also be healed. Additionally, I often find that there are other infections in the gut such as parasites, Candida, bacterial overgrowth, and bacterial imbalances that need to be addressed and corrected. For some, there may be a need to go completely grain-free due to the cross reactivity of gliadin sub-fractions in non-gluten grains. Also, a gut restoration may be in order to restore the guy mucosa and increase gut immunity.

When in doubt, go without. You’re not missing any vital nutrients by not eating gluten. In fact, you may be saving your life or the life of someone you love.

 

© 2013 Life Sources, Inc

All Rights Reserved

Saffron Sweet Potato & Rainbow Quinoa Soup

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 4

Spice up your dinner tonight with saffron. It is the most expensive spice in the world as each stigma needs to be hand-picked from every flower, it is used in cuisine for its light flavor and golden yellow color, and it has a long medicinal history as part of traditional healing. Studies indicate its benefit for cancer-suppression and prevention, immune-modulating, and antioxidant properties.

Ingredients:
6 cups/1.5 L of vegetable stock
1 clove of garlic
1 brown onion
1 purple sweet potato (any sweet potato will work)
1 orange sweet potato (any sweet potato will work)
¼ butternut squash (pumpkin)
1 carrot
1 zucchini
1 teaspoon sea salt and pepper to taste
I large pinch of saffron
1 cup/128 g. of rainbow quinoa

Directions:

1.) Simmer the vegetable stock in a pot.

2.) Chopped onion, garlic, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, carrot & zucchini.

3.) Add all vegetables to the simmering stock.

4.) Add quinoa, salt, pepper and saffron.

5.) Simmer 20-30mins or until the vegetables are cooked.

6.) Garnish with a dollop of coconut cream and sprinkle with chopped parsley and coriander (cilantro) leaves.

Substitutions:
Sweet potato – parsnip, turnip, winter squash, butternut squash
Carrot – parsnip, turnip
Zucchini – celery, celeriac root
Butternut Squash – pumpkin, turnip, parsnip, winter squash,
Quinoa – red lentils, split peas, wild rice

 

Easy Chicken Enchiladas Recipe

TOTAL TIME: Prep: 20 min. Bake: 30 min.

MAKES: 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cubed cooked chicken
  • 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened
  • 8 flour tortillas (8 inches)
  • 1 cup (8 ounces) plain yogurt or sour cream
  • 1 cup salsa
  • 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1 can (2-1/4 ounces) sliced ripe olives, drained
  • Shredded lettuce and chopped tomatoes, optional

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, combine chicken and cream cheese. Spoon about 1/4 cup chicken mixture down the center of each tortilla; roll up tightly. Place seam side down in a greased 13-in. x 9-in. baking dish.
  2. In a small bowl, combine yogurt and salsa; spread over tortillas. Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 20 minutes. Sprinkle with cheese and olives. Bake 10-15 minutes longer or until cheese is melted. Serve with lettuce and tomatoes if desired.

Enjoy !

Slow Cooker Butternut Squash Soup with Maple Roasted Chickpeas

Butternut squash is one of my all-time favorite soups. It always hits the spot. I love this recipe because you can throw everything in the slow cooker and walk away. In a few hours, you have a tasty soup waiting for you! Oh, and your house will smell amazing while it is cooking away!

 

Since the soup is so easy to make, I decided to jazz it up a bit by making Maple Roasted Chickpeas. They are the perfect garnish for the creamy butternut soup since it has a touch of maple syrup.

 

This soup has it all! It is silky, smooth, and slightly sweet. The maple roasted chickpeas add a nice crunch and are the perfect little “croutons” for the soup.

Slow Cooker Butternut Squash Soup with Maple Roasted Chickpeas is a must make recipe for fall! And if you are looking for a soup to serve at your Thanksgiving feast, let this be the one! It is so easy and so good! Plus, it is vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free! So if you are having guests with dietary restrictions, they will have something to enjoy!

Ingredients:

For the Butternut Squash Soup:
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
3 medium carrots, peeled and chopped
1 medium butternut squash, peeled, seeded and chopped into 1-inch cubes (about 5 cups)
1 large apple, peeled and chopped (I used Granny Smith)
2 (14 oz) cans low sodium vegetable broth
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
2 tablespoons maple syrup
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

For the Maple Roasted Chickpeas:
1 (15 oz) can Libby’s Organic Garbanzo Beans (chickpeas)
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 1/2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon salt

Directions:

1. Add the onion, carrots, butternut squash, and apple to the slow cooker. Pour the vegetable broth over all of the ingredients. Cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3 1/2 to 4 hours.

2. Once vegetables are cooked and soft, puree the soup using an immersion blender. Add the cinnamon, nutmeg, and maple syrup. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. If you don’t have an immersion blender, you can transfer the soup to a blender (in batches) and puree until smooth. Pour the soup back into the slow cooker and season with spices and maple syrup.

3. While the soup is cooking in the slow cooker, make the maple roasted chickpeas. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Rinse and drain the chickpeas and pat dry with a towel. Remove the skins by rolling them on the towel. In a small bowl, combine the canola oil, maple syrup, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Place the chickpeas on a large baking sheet. Pour the maple syrup mixture over the chickpeas and toss until chickpeas are well coated. Place in the oven and bake for 40-45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes or so. Remove from the oven when chickpeas are crunchy.

4. Pour soup into bowls and garnish with maple roasted chickpeas. Serve immediately.

Grilled Bruschetta Chicken

Here’s one of our healthy meal staples that we cook all the time. It’s full of flavor, only 200 calories, and has only five ingredients

Ingredients

  • 4 small boneless skinless chicken breast halves
  • 1/2 cup KRAFT Sun-Dried Tomato dressing, divided
  • 2 tomatoes, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil or 1 tsp. dried basil leaves

Instructions

  1. Place a large sheet of heavy-duty foil over half of grill grate; heat grill to medium heat. Meanwhile, place chicken in resealable plastic bag. Add 1/4 cup dressing and seal bag. Turn bag over several times to evenly coat chicken with dressing. Refrigerate 10 minutes (I marinate it all day if I remember in time). Remove chicken from bag; discard bag and dressing.
  2. Grill chicken on uncovered side of grill for about 6 minutes. Meanwhile, combine remaining 1/4 dressing, tomatoes, cheese and basil.
  3. Turn the chicken over and place cooked-side up, on foil on the grill. Top with tomato mixture. Close lid. Grill 8 minutes or until chicken is done.
  4. *Sometimes we add a splash of balsamic vinegar to give it a bit more zip.

So easy to make, and so delicious!

Bon Appetite !